North Goes East, Then Quickly West

Published: Jul 04 , 2013
Author: Alan Smith

George North is a big man. Currently on tour in Australia with the British and Irish Lions, North stands at 6 feet 4 inches and weighs in at 240 lbs. That is over 17 stones in old money, as my mother would say.

He is also only 21 years old and a prodigious rugby talent. In the first test he scored a phenomenal individual try and in the second a thunderous tackle that sent the Wallaby Israel Folau back several meters.

North plays on the wing and to add to his size and speed he also has a serious sidestep. You can see it in action for yourself here.

What is amazing is that North only learned his sidestep recently. Under tutelage from the Dutchman Frans Bosch, who is better known for working with high jumpers, North was taught the basic 5 moves that make the sidestep work.

Then hours and hours of practice allowed North to leave the Australian full back, Berrick Barnes for dead.

Developing any skill requires practice. But practice itself is useless unless it is properly directed. The negotiator who recognises the process they are engaged in and has the appropriate skill toolbox to call on at the right moment will often change the game in their favour.

There are times when you may need to surprise the other side into thinking and acting differently. Develop flexibility into your thinking and interrupt the other side of the table. Watch our video tip:

 Alan Smith


SHARE

Alan Smith

About the author:

Alan Smith
My background is marketing and advertising. After graduating in Economics I entered the agency world to become, at 28, MD of London's largest independent below-the-line marketing provider.

Read more about Alan Smith

More posts by Alan Smith

Latest Blog:

Fishy Business

This blog is a tribute to Orri Vigfússon, founder and Chairman of North Atlantic Salmon Fund (NASF), who sadly passed away in July. A champion and defender of the ‘King of Fish’, Orri was a visionary and selfless hero who dedicated his life and considerable personal means to reverse the decline in wild Atlantic salmon populations. For readers not familiar with the Atlantic salmon’s plight, the game-changing discovery in the 1950s and ‘60s of the salmon feeding grounds off the coasts of Greenland and the Faroe Islands led to large numbers of drift net and long line operations being set up which, combined with all forms of estuarial netting, led to the near collapse of salmon populations by the 1980s*.

Latest Tweet:

Scotwork UK Limited
7 Fortrose St
Glasgow
G11 5NU
United Kingdom
+44 (0) 1413573989
info@scotwork.com
Follow us
Scotwork 21092 - Training Course.png
voty2016_sign_gold.png