image1.JPG
© aisvector / Shutterstock.coM

Shark V Tiger

Published: Sep 07 , 2017
Author: Alan Smith

You may remember, or have kids that do, the magnificent game Top Trumps. It was a card game popular with kids’ in the 1970s and 1980s, especially amongst pre-teens, for whom it was a widespread playground pastime. The subjects covered included military hardware, modes of transport, racing cars and predators. The packs of cards tended to be priced so that children could collect out of their pocket money.

They also played to kids' fascination with competition. My own son was particularly fascinated with the predator cards. One memorable imagined battle was who would win in a fight between a shark and a tiger.

This came back into my mind as I watched the big money fight between Floyd Mayweather and Conor McGregor in one of the most eagerly awaited and highest earning fights in boxing history. Not sure which was the tiger and which the shark, but in their own fields they are both significant predators.

Floyd Mayweather beat Conor McGregor in Las Vegas, on Sunday morning claiming his 50th victory and maintaining his unbeaten record.

McGregor had been written off before the fight, but the Irishman surprised many of his critics with a largely professional display, taking the fight to 10 rounds.

Whilst McGregor got off to a flying start, throwing a series of punches at the 40-year-old and scoring a few early points, he was perhaps inevitably beaten by a technical knockout in the 10th round.

McGregor is a champion at Mixed Martial Arts, the largely brutal, anything-goes (except gouging and small joint manipulation!!!) sport, but he was outclassed in the ring by the much more disciplined and canny Mayweather.

I am occasionally asked the question about who would ‘win’ in a negotiation between a professional negotiator or a gifted amateur. Whilst the concept of a “win” in negotiation is different (an ideal situation, unlike in a fight is were both parties can at least claim some degree of victory) and the relative power and alternatives of the two parties have a lot to play in the outcome.

The reality is that the more comfortable that the negotiator is in that environment and the greater the skill set, honed by focused preparation, correct practice and repetition, the more likely they are to achieve their objectives.

Coached training and practice is the best way of achieving this.

Best not to get into the ring without it.


SHARE

Alan Smith

About the author:

Alan Smith
My background is marketing and advertising. After graduating in Economics I entered the agency world to become, at 28, MD of London's largest independent below-the-line marketing provider.

Read more about Alan Smith

More posts by Alan Smith

Latest Blog:

Fishy Business

This blog is a tribute to Orri Vigfússon, founder and Chairman of North Atlantic Salmon Fund (NASF), who sadly passed away in July. A champion and defender of the ‘King of Fish’, Orri was a visionary and selfless hero who dedicated his life and considerable personal means to reverse the decline in wild Atlantic salmon populations. For readers not familiar with the Atlantic salmon’s plight, the game-changing discovery in the 1950s and ‘60s of the salmon feeding grounds off the coasts of Greenland and the Faroe Islands led to large numbers of drift net and long line operations being set up which, combined with all forms of estuarial netting, led to the near collapse of salmon populations by the 1980s*.

Latest Tweet:

Scotwork UK Limited
7 Fortrose St
Glasgow
G11 5NU
United Kingdom
+44 (0) 1413573989
info@scotwork.com
Follow us
Scotwork 21092 - Training Course.png
voty2016_sign_gold.png